Textile art – Kofoti http://kofoti.org/ Sun, 09 Oct 2022 13:45:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://kofoti.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-20-150x150.png Textile art – Kofoti http://kofoti.org/ 32 32 India Mahdavi’s ‘Frankly Yours’ Reinterprets Josef Frank’s Botanical Textile Art | News STIRpad https://kofoti.org/india-mahdavis-frankly-yours-reinterprets-josef-franks-botanical-textile-art-news-stirpad/ Wed, 05 Oct 2022 08:49:50 +0000 https://kofoti.org/india-mahdavis-frankly-yours-reinterprets-josef-franks-botanical-textile-art-news-stirpad/ Iranian-French architect and designer India Mahdavi gives a new twist to the fundamental “tree of life” archetype that dots the textile art engravings by Josef Frank, one of the first figures of Viennese modernism. Taking inspiration from the hand-printed Vegetable Tree fabric of the Austrian architect of the 1940s, Mahdavi covered these prints on the […]]]>

Iranian-French architect and designer India Mahdavi gives a new twist to the fundamental “tree of life” archetype that dots the textile art engravings by Josef Frank, one of the first figures of Viennese modernism. Taking inspiration from the hand-printed Vegetable Tree fabric of the Austrian architect of the 1940s, Mahdavi covered these prints on the walls, furniturecushions and lampshades for a exposure title Sincerely yours, India Mahdavi. The showcase, presented in collaboration with Swedish interior design Svenskt Tenn, open to the public during the recent Stockholm Design Week. Designs – including illustrations of fruits, vegetables, leaves and flowers – evoke the untamed exuberance of nature within the enclosed setting and echo the words of Frank, who believed that bright colors and powerful patterns could take away the feeling of confinement.




Frankly Yours, India Mahdavi, an exhibition presented at the Svenskt Tenn store in Stockholm Image: Courtesy of Svenskt Tenn

“The ‘Vegetable Tree’ print takes us back to the root of life: nature in its purest form. The joy I seek to convey through my projects is well represented through print and its wide range of colors. This exhibit is an exaggeration, where I placed the fabric all over the walls and furniture. It is a caricature of space, which makes it possible to perceive it differently and to highlight its beauty,” Mahdavi shares in an official press release.



The interior of the store features furniture from Frank and Mahdavi
The interior of the store features furniture from Frank and Mahdavi Image: Courtesy of Svenskt Tenn

Trying to breathe and breathe freedom into confined rooms, a goal Frank sought with every piece of his botanical art, Mahdavi’s work with this exhibition also seeks that liberation in the prints. “I wanted it to be super fresh. I wanted that when you walk into the exhibition space you find a feeling of happiness, showing how modern and timeless these fabrics are. The way I use this pattern, I wanted it to be a bit more radical, so I used the pattern as an overall feature covering all of Frank’s furniture and some of my own. It’s really a conversation we have,” adds Mahdavi.



Patterns convey a sense of happiness and freedom in enclosed spaces
Patterns convey a sense of happiness and freedom in enclosed spaces Image: Courtesy of Svenskt Tenn



Originally designed by Josef Frank, the textile design contrasts sharply with the standardized interiors
Originally designed by Josef Frank, the textile design contrasts sharply with the standardized interiors Image: Courtesy of Svenskt Tenn

The patterns, originally designed by Frank in New York from 1943 to 1945, conveyed his small appreciation for french architect by Le Corbusier conviction that a house should be a machine for living in. For him, standardization interiors meditate on the principles of modernism and producing things like tubular steel furniture was a threat to humanity. Rather, he preferred utilitarian pieces that people could see through. He joined Svenskt Tenn in 1934 where he worked closely with company founder Estrid Ericson. The duo received huge attention for designing the Svenskt Tenn showroom at the World Expos in Paris in 1937 and New York in 1939, projects which would become the model for the expression “Swedish Modern”.



Vases designed by India Mahdavi presented as part of the exhibition
Vases designed by India Mahdavi presented as part of the exhibition Image: Courtesy of Svenskt Tenn



Trays designed by India Mahdavi for the exhibition
Trays designed by India Mahdavi for the exhibition Image: Courtesy of Svenskt Tenn

truly yours also features a lampshade by Mahdavi, inspired by Frank’s 2326 lamp, as well as two pewter objects (a vase and a tray) that she designed as a tribute to Ericson’s work. “At the age of 30,” Mahdavi shares. “In 1924, she [Ericson] was already such an example for women: a strong and independent entrepreneur. The entire project honors the history, origins and work of Svenskt Tenn, Estrid Ericson and Josef Frank.



Lampshade designed by India Mahdavi featured as part of the showcase
Lampshade designed by India Mahdavi featured as part of the showcase Image: Courtesy of Svenskt Tenn

The floor lamp, she continues, “is all about the hype, with orange colors and a vibrant shade. The two pewter pieces are inspired by some of my small objects – sold in my eponymous shop located rue Las Cases in Paris.

A recurring thread in most of his work, color originally found its way into Mahdavi’s life following his eclectic childhood. She credits her close connection with colors to her memory and inheritance: from his Iranian and Egyptian roots, having grown up in the United States in the 60s and living in the south of France. “It’s a language that I learned to use fluently. As I see it, colors have conversations. They argue and reconcile,” she says. A similar conversation is sparked at Svenskt Tenn, and as Mahdavi puts it, “frankly It works very well.

Sincerely yours, India Mahdavi is on display at the Svenskt Tenn store in stockholm from September 05, 2022 to October 23, 2022.

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A Foreigner Found Our Historic Malay Textile Art So Fascinating He Started His Own Collection https://kofoti.org/a-foreigner-found-our-historic-malay-textile-art-so-fascinating-he-started-his-own-collection/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/a-foreigner-found-our-historic-malay-textile-art-so-fascinating-he-started-his-own-collection/ Subscribe to our Telegram channel for the latest stories and updates. A patron of Asian arts and an avid art collector, John Ang has been collecting Malaysian textiles since 2014. Now showcasing his new collection of Malaysian textiles in an exhibition, we were intrigued to find out how the American citizen became so involved in […]]]>

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A patron of Asian arts and an avid art collector, John Ang has been collecting Malaysian textiles since 2014. Now showcasing his new collection of Malaysian textiles in an exhibition, we were intrigued to find out how the American citizen became so involved in textiles. of our country, some widely cherished and some even forgotten. In an exclusive interview, we could hear interesting stories and artistic values ​​of the textiles he collected along his journey.

READ MORE: There is a textile exhibition displaying 12 types of Malaysian textiles in KL until 30 October

These outfits of Malay men and women will welcome you as soon as you enter the exhibition.
(Credit: Melissa Suraya Ismail/TRP)

It all started with a disaster

John Ang has been collecting textiles for 53 years before really getting into Malaysian textiles. He vividly remembers that he had just returned from Bali to Taiwan and that he had brought home a beautiful textile that he loved. But, he didn’t know what the particular textile was. It doesn’t sound Indonesian to him but he didn’t think it was Malaysian. One thing is certain, it was magnificent.

However, there was an oil stain on it and when he cleaned it up himself by soaking it in mild detergent overnight, it got worse. The next thing he knew was that the fabric was ragged. It bothered him because he didn’t even know what kind of fabric it was. He only took a photo of it for memory. It was all a disaster.

An example of Limar Bersongket in the exhibition.
(Credit: Melissa Suraya Ismail/TRP)

Then, after a while, he happened to be in KL and saw in a local newspaper the same, but more breathtaking, textile that he had destroyed before. They were showing it to Tun Dr Mahathir at the Museum of Islamic Arts in Kuala Lumpur. If they show it to the famous politician, it must have been important.

After asking his Malaysian friends about it, he found out it was called a Tenggarunga kind of Limar Bersongket textile. Limar is a type of textile where patterns are created by first resist-dying a bunch of tightly bound threads in different areas before weaving them to form a required pattern.

A Batik stamp.
(Credit: Melissa Suraya Ismail/TRP)

Songket on the other hand, an additional weft (golden or colored thread) is decoratively sewn on top of the base fabric. Limar Bersongket is essentially the Limar fabric, with additional gold or colored threads sewn above. These types of textiles cannot be soaked for too long or brushed. It must be correctly cleaned up the right way.

He asked his friends to find a piece of Limar Bersongket for him. However, when they did, he found the price rather unreasonable. He told them to give him a day to think about it. When he researched and discovered the true extravagant value of the textile, the fabric was long gone, snatched up by another buyer.

Hey, what do you know, we even had a Burberry Tenunan before Burberry even existed.
(Credit: Melissa Suraya Ismail/TRP)

He was frustrated again. He even flew from Taiwan to Terengganu to see it. All of these issues for an exuberant fabric made him even more addicted to finding the beautifully intricate textile. And so he began to dig deeper into the Malaysian textile world.

Now he’s over 13 Tengkarung in his collection but he still remembered the first ones he had fallen in love with, but which were not his. If you love something, let it go, right?

From Disaster to Mastery

John Ang is a citizen born in the United States to Singaporean parents. After earning his BS and MA in Asian Art History at the University of Michigan, he started out as an art journalist in Japan, then moved to Taipei to open a gallery of antiques, Asian furniture, textiles, ceramics and jewelry.

John Ang.
(Credit: Melissa Suraya Ismail/TRP)

After almost 30 years at the helm of the gallery, he moved to Malaysia in 2018 to devote himself to collecting and researching Malaysian textiles. Now he has over 5,000 pieces of Malay textiles and 700 of them are now featured in his Splendor of textiles from the Malay world exhibition at Menara Ken, TTDI, until October 30, 2022.

Of Songket and Limar at Renda and Anyaman, he divided the 700 pieces into 12 categories to facilitate their identification and study by the public. He also put international pieces he collected near the Malay pieces so that visitors can make comparisons and see how the art has traveled from one origin and adapted to another.

The monkeyp or fabric used to cover babies during their cukur jambul ceremony (of head shaving).
(Credit: Melissa Suraya Ismail/TRP)

The 12 categories on display are Songket (brocade), Limar (weft ikat), Telepuk (gold leaf applique), Tekatan (embroidery), Pelangi (tie dye), Ikat Loseng (ikat string), Tenunan (plain weave of stripes and checks, Linangkit (tapestry), Cetakan (prints), Batik (wax resin), Renda (lace) and Anyaman (non-spun woven vegetable fiber).

How is this collection so different from the others?

It is the first of its time, as it is a cross-regional collection.

“Most of the Malaysian textile collections are regional, while my collection is cross-regional. I have textiles from the Philippines, Cambodia, Vietnam, Persia, and even England, which are actually Malay. It is because of the Malaysian global market which was so strong once upon a time.

This particular textile came from England with Malay and British designs.
(Credit: Melissa Suraya Ismail/TRP)

“You see, the Malay world was actually the sea (maritime trade), and the port cities were the outskirts. They were connected by the sea and because of this they became homogeneous. Malay cultures are everywhere, basically.

“For example, every Malaysian country in Dunia Melayu has laksa. But laksa differs by region due to their regional climate, herbs and taste. This is the Malay world, both diverse and homogeneous.

These are the regions that the Malay world covered.
(Credit: Melissa Suraya Ismail/TRP)

“But now that we’re apart, so many people don’t focus on the concept of the Malay world. Some will say that this country is considered Malaysian and what is not, so it is controversial. The periphery of the Malay world fades.

“So I specify through the similarities of the textiles. You can’t just focus on one region. For example, I saw this particular symbol in a Malaysian ditty and asked them what it was. They didn’t really know. But when I saw the same symbol in Banjarmasin in Indonesia, they can tell me the meaning and the story behind it. It is because they are so far apart that they have managed to keep the meaning.

(Credit: Melissa Suraya Ismail/TRP)

“In Malaysia, development is so fast, a lot of things are forgotten and undocumented. So when you go beyond the region, you can rebuild your culture and bring back what’s yours. And that’s why my collection is different. It tells stories that sometimes the locals didn’t even know, but are actually related to them.

Some interesting textiles in his collection

No doubt, John loves all of his collections, but there are particular pieces that he adores because of the stories behind them.

One of its precious pieces is the Limar Berayat. It is very valuable because it contains inscriptions from the Quran and he is proud to be able to collect some of them. It even has a Sanskrit inscribed patola (a type of Indian fabric similar to Limar) put next to Limar Berayat to show the similarities between Malay and Indian textiles.

Limar Berayat is the green on the right.
(Credit: Melissa Suraya Ismail/TRP)

“Another precious piece that belongs to me is the Pelangi (Tie-dye) Sapu Tangan (handkerchief). It didn’t cost me much but I like it because it’s rare. I know I have the only one left in good condition because this stuff is usually worn, torn and discarded back in the day.

The purple Pelangi handkerchief he mentioned.
(Credit: Melissa Suraya Ismail/TRP)

Also, the oldest piece of textile he has in the collection is the Indian patola from the 17th century. It looks like it’s torn because of its age, but in fact the fabric was purposely cut for use as medicine. Because they are so difficult to make and expensive, some believe they are imbued with magical powers that could heal people.

The Patolu Indian with said magical powers. Do not touch! It’s about 400 years old!
(Credit: Melissa Suraya Ismail/TRP)

There is also a piece of Pelangi (tie-dye) called law where two or three colors are used in a fabric and a blank diamond or rectangular shape is created in the center. This law is usually strung over widows like a shawl, signifying that they are ready to remarry.

John Ang explaining the empty center in the law signifies the emptiness of a widow’s life when she loses her husband.
(Credit: Melissa Suraya Ismail/TRP)

Hope for the future

John hopes his entire collection will find a home here in Malaysia one day. He dreams of finally handing over to a foundation here so that they can properly and carefully protect the Malay textile collection for the future generation to see. Things like these should be cherished and protected.

In addition, after completing this exhibition, it will then pursue a specific exhibition among the 12 categories starting with Songketfrom December to January.

Come and see the exhibition. Claim what the textile shares with your culture and be aware of it in order to be proud of it.

Come and discover your true identity as Malay textiles reveal all aspects of the Malay people.

John Ang, art historian and collector at TRP

The Splendors of Malay World Textiles

Date: July 24 – October 30, 2022 (3 months)
Venue: M Floor, Hall 1, Menara KEN TTDI, 37 Jalan Burhanuddin Helmi, Kuala Lumpur, 60000 Malaysia
Gallery opening hours: 10:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. (Open every day except Monday)
Tickets:
RM35 for adults
RM20 for students
RM50 for a group tour guided by John Ang himself (min 5 people in a group)

You can also request a free tour from John Ang students if you want to learn more about specific pieces.

Get your tickets here.

READ MORE: Did you know that you wear your relationship status on your Kain Batik?

READ MORE: These 5 Ways To Wear The Traditional Malay Tengkolok For Women Mean Different Things


Share your thoughts with us via TRP Facebook, Twitterand instagram.

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Textile art celebrated in all its forms https://kofoti.org/textile-art-celebrated-in-all-its-forms/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 19:12:40 +0000 https://kofoti.org/textile-art-celebrated-in-all-its-forms/ Visual arts add color and inspiration to the Jumpers and Jazz in July 2022 festival. Many months of designing, knitting, sewing and problem solving come to an end as artworks are installed to be enjoyed by thousands of festival visitors. Wool Bomb Tree Jumpers Warwick Art Gallery is proud to present the official Yarn Bombed […]]]>

Visual arts add color and inspiration to the Jumpers and Jazz in July 2022 festival. Many months of designing, knitting, sewing and problem solving come to an end as artworks are installed to be enjoyed by thousands of festival visitors.

Wool Bomb Tree Jumpers

Warwick Art Gallery is proud to present the official Yarn Bombed Tree Jumper exhibition for the eighteenth year. Over 100 delightfully unique and beautifully designed works of art will be wrapped around the trunks and branches of the trees on Palmerin and Fitzroy Streets and the car park behind Warwick Town Hall. Entries for the official exhibition have arrived by post from as far away as Lincolnshire in the UK, but most entries are created by entrants from South East Queensland, the majority by businesses from the South Downs , community groups and talented local artisans.

Guided tours

Gallery director Karina Devine will lead hour-long guided tours of the highlights of the Tree jumper exhibition during Jumpers & Jazz in July – dates and times are in the official festival program.

Wide Eight Art Australian Quilt Exhibition

In addition to the famous Tree Jumper exhibition, the Warwick Art Gallery will present Australia Wide Eight, a traveling exhibition organized by the Oz Quilt Network. Australia Wide Eight will premiere at the Warwick Art Gallery before touring the country until 2024.

Featuring small-scale contemporary art quilts, the exhibition features works by thirty-six artists selected by an esteemed jury; textile artists Lisa Walton and Cathy Jack Coupland and Sophie O’Brien, curatorial and learning manager for the Bundanon Art Museum, NSW.

Paper Quilt Community Project – Abundance

Also at the Warwick Art Gallery, a community project that has been in the making for six months will be unveiled. The Paper Quilt Project is a collaborative installation created from hundreds of paper artworks all with the word ABUNDANCE. Children, the elderly, people with disabilities, members of community groups and artists have contributed to the project with works of art which will be stitched together by Gallery volunteers. The word “abundance” was chosen for its positivity, encouraging attendees to celebrate what makes them happy.

Alison McDonald’s sculpture rejecting

The Gallery will also install the incredible Casting Off sculpture by award-winning Townsville artist Alison McDonald. Inspired by the favorite retro Granny Square, this work of art is made entirely of thousands of plastic lids and zip ties. From a distance, the work looks colorful and comfortable, but as you get closer, you realize that the materials used are plastic, hard and prickly. Alison McDonald is passionate about recycling

craft market

The Gallery’s biggest event of the year, the Artisan Market, will be held on Saturday July 23rd. The curated market will feature handmade creations by Peekay’s Gifts, Pullen Threads, Bush Bower Bird, Mandy T’s Veggie Hut and Chook House Art, to name a few. It’s a great day out with live music, a coffee van and a barbecue.

Warwick Art Gallery is open daily during the Jumpers & Jazz in July festival from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jumpers and Jazz in July begins Thursday, July 21 and continues through Sunday, July 31. The program is on the festival website www.jumpersandjazz.com.au

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Ritzi Jacobi, mind-blowing textile artist, dies at 80 https://kofoti.org/ritzi-jacobi-mind-blowing-textile-artist-dies-at-80/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 19:21:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/ritzi-jacobi-mind-blowing-textile-artist-dies-at-80/ Ritzi Jacobi, a European pioneer of contemporary textile and fiber art, best known for her monumental wall hangings and soft sculptures, died on June 19 at her home in Düsseldorf, Germany. She was 80 years old. The death was confirmed by her husband, Heinz Possert, who did not specify a cause. Ms. Jacobi’s enormous textile […]]]>

Ritzi Jacobi, a European pioneer of contemporary textile and fiber art, best known for her monumental wall hangings and soft sculptures, died on June 19 at her home in Düsseldorf, Germany. She was 80 years old.

The death was confirmed by her husband, Heinz Possert, who did not specify a cause.

Ms. Jacobi’s enormous textile creations were made of a variety of fiber materials ranging from cotton to goat hair. Although his work bears some resemblance to traditional tapestry, he pushed the form into modernist and abstract realms.

She “had a huge impact on the field of crafts and art,” said Jane Milosch, former curator of contemporary crafts at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Warren Seelig, professor emeritus at University of the Arts in Philadelphia, which held an exhibition of her work in 1994, said that while Ms. Jacobi was often described as a “fiber artist,” her work was not easily categorized.

“She was probably one of the very first truly interdisciplinary artists, mixing all sorts of things,” he said. “She was not a myopic weaver. She worked broadly, with paper and metal and cloth and fiber and goat hair – all that sort of thing. In the end, it was his tapestry that was really provocative and innovative.

Victoria Areclia Gavrila was born on August 12, 1941 in Bucharest, Romania, to Nicolae and Marieta Gavrila. Her father worked for the railroad and her mother was a housewife. (She was nicknamed Ritzi, a short form of the Romanian diminutive of Victoria, Victoritza.)

Her early childhood was marked by the turmoil and deprivation of World War II, said Ms Milosch, who conducted a five-hour interview with Ms Jacobi for a Smithsonian oral history project in 2010.

“She didn’t have any traditional toys growing up, not even a teddy bear,” Ms Milosch wrote in an email. Instead, “she was intrigued by ‘playing’ with her own clothes, and started taking them apart early on, studying them inside out – so sort of her first foray into textile work. .”

Although Ritzi grew up in Bucharest, the capital, she often visited relatives in the countryside, where she began to experiment with natural materials.

Encouraged by her parents to explore her budding creativity, she excelled in drawing and painting in primary and secondary school. She was accepted at the Institutul de Arte Plastice in Bucharest, now known as National University of Arts in Bucharestto study applied arts.

Ritzi arrived there in 1961, and she soon met Peter Jacobi, a sculpture student four years her senior. “She was in her first year and I was in my sixth, so we spent a year together,” Mr. Jacobi said in an interview. “We became a couple that year.”

Within a year of graduating, Jacobi took a job in the Romanian town of Craiova, where traditional Turkish weavers had been making rugs, or kilims, from goat hair since the Empire. Ottoman, he said.

When the couple first started collaborating on artwork, goat hair was one of their favorite materials. They married in 1966.

Romania became a communist country in 1947 and Ms. Jacobi’s school years coincided with the rise to power of Nicolae Ceaușescu, who would become the nation’s dictator in 1968, turning it into a totalitarian state.

“It was not an easy time for artists,” Ms. Jacobi’s German art dealer Volker Diehl said in an interview. The Jacobis chose to work in fiber and textiles, at least in part, he said, because “the art censors didn’t take that kind of work seriously, and so they could work without any censorship and without any pressure”.

Their work follows the long Romanian folk tradition of weaving, which has produced lushly colored tapestries and rugs. But while borrowing from this heritage, the Jacobis produce weavings that are more akin to sculptural reliefs, retaining the natural colors of the materials, including cotton, untreated cardboard, sandpaper, sisal, coconut fiber and graphite.

American Craft magazine credits the Jacobis with introducing goat hair to contemporary textile art. And art historians recognize their work as part of the “new tapestry” movement, carried by a group of artists working with traditional craftsmanship, among them Magdalena Abakanowicz from Poland, Jagoda Buić from Croatia and the Americans Lenore Tawney, Claire Zeisler and Sheila Hicks.

“Their work is really part of a phenomenon of that moment in 1968 when all of these art forms were booming,” Ms. Milosch said. “But theirs was very specific as a very monumental tapestry. Their rooms were so large that they would command wonder, and they would engulf you, as they were also very organically architectural.

In 1969, the Jacobis exhibited at the International Tapestry Biennial in Lausanne, Switzerland. A year later, they were invited to represent Romania at the Venice Biennale.

After receiving a special visa to leave Romania to attend this art fair, the couple defected to Germany. “Like many other artists and writers, they made that choice,” Ms. Milosch said, “but it was a tough choice because it meant cutting themselves off from their family.”

The Jacobis worked closely together for almost two decades. Mr. Diehl said people often assume that Mr. Jacobi is the creative force behind the couple, but in fact it is often the other way around.

Their first major solo exhibition in the United States was at the Detroit Institute of Arts; he then traveled to several other venues, including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

The couple’s marriage and creative partnership ended in 1984, the same year they had an exhibition at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville in Paris and the Galerie Nationale D’Art Textile in the French town of Beauvais.

Ms. Jacobi works from then on as a solo artist.

“She was thriving,” Ms Milosch said. She was “pushing much of the work they had created together in even farther directions.”

In 1994, Ms. Jacobi was the subject of a solo show“The Impulse to Abstract: Recent Work by Ritzi Jacobi”, organized by the Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia.

Professor Seelig, who organized the exhibition, recalled that at that time “she was practically blind”.

“She was wearing coke bottle lenses,” he said, “and she wasn’t very verbal, but she was making these massive pieces, and it took a lot of focus.”

He described Ms. Jacobi’s working process as “haptic, thinking through touch”.

“Her surfaces almost burst naturally, they blistered, they looked so natural, and it was because of the way she played with tension and compression,” Professor Seelig said. “It really came from the thought that his hands were doing touching the material.”

His latest gallery exhibition, “The Dark Agestook place at the Diehl gallery in Berlin in 2019.

In addition to Mr. Possert, Ms. Jacobi is survived by her brother, Dr. Florian Gabriel, a doctor.

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Artist Jayshree Poddar relies on textile art to capture the luminance of the moon https://kofoti.org/artist-jayshree-poddar-relies-on-textile-art-to-capture-the-luminance-of-the-moon/ Fri, 15 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/artist-jayshree-poddar-relies-on-textile-art-to-capture-the-luminance-of-the-moon/ A scientific partisan for some and for others at the heart of a budding romantic relationship, the moon has always been a subject of interest among many others. Often approached as a chariot of emotions or even as a ritual symbol, the celestial body finds its expression in various contexts. Exploring the meaning of the […]]]>

A scientific partisan for some and for others at the heart of a budding romantic relationship, the moon has always been a subject of interest among many others. Often approached as a chariot of emotions or even as a ritual symbol, the celestial body finds its expression in various contexts. Exploring the meaning of the moon in all its forms and glories, textile designer Jayshree Poddar talks to STIR about her latest exhibition, many moonsat the Bangalore International Centre, while shining the spotlight on his illustrious eponymous publication.

A seasoned weaver and design director of textile design company Himatsingka Seide Limited, Poddar has been associated with the world of textiles for over three decades. She was introduced to the art of weaving while exploring the field of ceramic for childhood design. many moons is a poetic showcase of Poddar’s love for the night orb with all its imperfections and dazzling luminosity. The sensory experience in woven silk celebrates the spiritual expression of the moon while intertwining it with the functionality and materiality of fabrics. We climb into his creative cave…




Multiple layers of jacquard fabric with moon prints Image: Courtesy of Bangalore International Center


Ayushi Mathur: Can you explain to us the conceptualization of Many Moons?

Jayshree Poddar: For the concept, I used my knowledge of double weave, which is the same fabric that can split into two or more layers and within the limits of the width of the loom; I represented the three stages of the moon. The single layer represents the first full moon, which then splits into two layers and represents the changing crescent moon. Ultimately, the fabric splits into four layers to show the new full moon. Equally beautiful, the complete moon cycle is woven across the length of the loom and hangs from the gallery ceiling. So the way it moved through the gallery space, I felt there was space in the fabric and the fabric moved through the space.



  • 'Many Moons' by Jayshree Poddar at the BIC |  Many Moons |Exhibition |  Jayshree Poddar|  STIRworld
    Night traveler woven on fabric Image: Courtesy of Bangalore International Center






  • 'Many Moons' by Jayshree Poddar at the BIC |  Many Moons |Exhibition |  Jayshree Poddar |  STIRworld
    Shadows between fabrics creating many moons Image: Courtesy of Bangalore International Center



Ayushi: What about the moon inspired you to explore it on an artistic level?

Jayshee: Basically, I wanted a subject that was luminous. What interested me was that the moon, as we all know, is bright, silvery, and has a regularized predictive cycle. I wondered if this reliability could also be rooted in ordinary life. We all face our challenges in life, but I believe that there is some order in this universe, whether psychological or physiological, and that same order can be felt when I observe the moon and see it. ‘Express. It was purely my love for this divine object that motivated me enough to explore it artistically.




many moons Video: Courtesy of Bangalore International Center


Ayushi: The moon isn’t perfect. It is full of irregularities. How do you think irregularities can adorn jewelry for a subject of beauty?

Jayshee: Frankly, the irregularity of the moon’s surface did not appeal to me. If you look at the pictures of the moon on the net or in books, up close with all its irregularities, it is no longer attractive. As the subject of my art, I chose the distant view of the moon where it looks bright and a perfect round or crescent without any irregularities. However, I only addressed these irregularities in the course of the exhibition and not through any material. I wanted the exhibition to be experiential through the materials, the warp, the weft and the feeling.



'Many Moons' by Jayshree Poddar at the BIC |  Many Moons |Exhibition |  Jayshree Poddar |  STIRworld
Embracing the layers of fabric in a continuous loom Image: Courtesy of Bangalore International Center


Ayushi: How do you think the moon can impact, process and emanate emotions?

Jayshee: I just think it’s a matter of calm and acceptance. I don’t know if the moon’s surface is cool nearby, but the view from afar reflects a sense of serenity and tranquility. Alongside a sense of celebration due to its predictability and reflective qualities. Even the color silver, often associated with the moon, gives a fresh impression.

Ayushi: Can you explain to us the implementation of your work? many moons at the gallery?

Jayshee: I was familiar with the gallery space of Bangalore International Center and went ahead and wove the jacquard moon. I love woven gauze, so I used cheap silver polyester as the moon and a black sponge to highlight the parts of the moon that aren’t visible. However, before I could formulate the larger image and piece, I created the moon cycle on a smaller loom before interweaving it on the larger loom on display at BIC.

Ayushi: How was the multisensory experience designed and integrated into the show? Previously, you also had a book called many moonscould you specify the link between the two?

Jayshee: The main exhibition space, which I like to call the Main dish, was designed to be immersive. I worked with Ahmedabad-based architect Harsh Bhavsar to create a multi-sensory experience. In order to make the exhibit immersive, I included custom composed music to listen to, jasmine flowers to smell, and fabrics to feel. In the book, I used the title many moons as an interpretation of a timekeeper and guardian of the spirit, as I am told that in India a person’s lifespan can be measured by the number of full moons you see. To establish the essence of the moon in the book, I focused on interweaving it on the cover with a silver moon woven with a silk warp cover. As for the Bangalore International Center exhibition, we called it many moons simply because there were so many moons woven into the fabrics that created even more crescent and circle shadows on the floor of the gallery and hallway.



  • 'Many Moons' by Jayshree Poddar at the BIC |  Many Moons |Exhibition |  Jayshree Poddar |  STIRworld
    many moons, an immersive exhibition by Jayshree Poddar Image: Courtesy of Bangalore International Center






  • 'Many Moons' by Jayshree Poddar at the BIC |  Many Moons |Exhibition |  Jayshree Poddar |  STIRworld
    Jayshree embraces the shape, irregularities and luminosity of the moon Image: Courtesy of Bangalore International Center



Ayushi: Is there a particular exhibit on display or in the book that spoke to you?

Jayshee: The feeling of resonance with a subject keeps changing. For the exhibition as for the book, I resonated with the moon. It’s fascinating and I love its spherical shape and the aura it carries, but in my book there are a lot of different topics that I love, including ‘wabi-sabi’, a Japanese aesthetic term for something irregular but beautiful, it makes me understand and appreciate things that deteriorate or degenerate.



'Many Moons' by Jayshree Poddar at the BIC |  Many Moons |Exhibition |  Jayshree Poddar |  STIRworld
Loom layers with the moon Image: Courtesy of Bangalore International Center


Many Moons by Jayshree Poddar was presented at the Bangalore International Center from June 5-10, 2022.

]]>
An exhibition examines contemporary textile art in Ankara, Turkey https://kofoti.org/an-exhibition-examines-contemporary-textile-art-in-ankara-turkey/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/an-exhibition-examines-contemporary-textile-art-in-ankara-turkey/ Muse Contemporary is organizing a new exhibition dedicated to contemporary textile art as part of the Başkent Culture Road Festival in the capital Ankara. Bringing together female artists from eight different countries and cultures under one roof, the exhibition “Tissage Tradition/Futur” at Cermodern brings a new look at an art form that is not taken […]]]>

Muse Contemporary is organizing a new exhibition dedicated to contemporary textile art as part of the Başkent Culture Road Festival in the capital Ankara. Bringing together female artists from eight different countries and cultures under one roof, the exhibition “Tissage Tradition/Futur” at Cermodern brings a new look at an art form that is not taken seriously because of its gendered past. .

The foreign female artists in the exhibition were invited to Turkey by Muse Contemporary under the auspices of their countries’ embassies and in collaboration with cultural attaches. Contemporary performers and pioneers of textile art from Finland, France, South Africa, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Italy and Turkey feature in the selection curated by curator Ayşe Pınar Akalın.

“Dark on Colors” by Maria Munoz.

Until recently, textiles were not accepted by the masses as a valid artistic medium. This situation, due in part to the functionality of the form, makes it accepted as a craft rather than an artistic endeavor. However, the main reason that prevents textiles from being taken seriously in the art world is that they are associated with a genre. Textile arts such as weaving, knitting, sewing and embroidery have been considered “women’s work” in various cultures throughout history and have therefore been largely overlooked. On the other hand, we must consider that textile art is one of the oldest transmitters of meaning accompanying cave paintings.

Textile artists protect the art form by destroying the prejudices that surround it and reusing the medium with strong expressions today. In this context, Muse Contemporary aims to advance a branch of art that empowers women. With contemporary textile interpretations by artists from different cultures and countries, the exhibition conveys strong expressions.

At the exhibition, which is attended by artists from seven countries in addition to Turkey, at least three works by each artist are exhibited. The artists in the exhibition use their artisanal works as a tool to convey strong expressions on the themes of femininity and tradition.



“Goddess” by Suzan Batu.

Jenny Ymker from the Netherlands creates her own fantasy world in reality in the photographs she weaves into the tapestry. Kimathi Mafafo from South Africa carries on her grandmother’s legacy by remembering her teachings on weaving and embroidery. Lithian Ricci from Italy encourages women’s cooperation in the rugs she weaves with Turkish artisans. Lotta-Pia Kallio, from Finland, sees the working process as a ritual in which worn and broken objects change shape and are born in other forms. Maria Munoz from Spain references the joie de vivre we have been deprived of after the pandemic with embroidery pieces made from recycled silk threads. Petra Hultman from Sweden brings together miles of yarn that have been knitted over countless hours with her large-scale lace installations. While Stephanie Laleuw from France brings her own crafted pieces to life in her embroidery, crochet and embellishments, where she uses exuberant colors as well as collectibles; Suzan Batu from Turkey draws attention to the place of women in the male-dominated world with her goddesses made from Sümerbank fabrics.

The artists in the exhibition act as a bridge between the past and the future. They highlight the importance of work by reinterpreting tradition and the traditional through the prism of contemporary themes such as sustainability and recycling. By creating contemporary archives, they ensure the transmission of lost values ​​to future generations.

“Tissage Tradition/Futur” will take place until June 12 and can be visited free of charge at Cermodern.

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Stitch Buffalo, the textile art of the refugees presented at the Museum of History https://kofoti.org/stitch-buffalo-the-textile-art-of-the-refugees-presented-at-the-museum-of-history/ Fri, 20 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/stitch-buffalo-the-textile-art-of-the-refugees-presented-at-the-museum-of-history/ Bright colors are inseparable from Nepalese culture. Vibrant shades of red, in particular, adorn the vestments of women and monks, while the national flag and flower of Nepal are both red. Attention-grabbing hues permeate home decorations, like the door hangings that will be on display at Stitch Buffalo’s art exhibition, which opens Saturday at Buffalo […]]]>

Bright colors are inseparable from Nepalese culture. Vibrant shades of red, in particular, adorn the vestments of women and monks, while the national flag and flower of Nepal are both red.

Attention-grabbing hues permeate home decorations, like the door hangings that will be on display at Stitch Buffalo’s art exhibition, which opens Saturday at Buffalo History Museum.

Tila Bastola and her sisters Saraswati Tiwari and Tika Bhattarai — three Nepalese textile artists at Stitch, a nonprofit at 1215 Niagara St. — agreed that the door hangings are far from an American welcome mat; they adorn the door frames of every room in a Nepalese home, even the bathroom.

Dawne Hoeg, the founder and executive director of Stitch, once approached American pom pom makers to help with the process of making these door hangings, but she was quickly rebuffed.

People also read…

“No, no, no pom-pom makers,” Tiwari recalled telling Hoeg. “We like to do it our way.”






Refugees from Nepal display vibrant door hangings that will be part of the Stitch Buffalo exhibit at the Buffalo History Museum. Saraswati Tiwari, left, stands behind her daughter Sachika Tiwari, 5, and niece Sijal Adhikari, 5. Tila Bastola holds an embroidered sign, while Tika Bhattarai, Sijal’s mother, holds another hanging door to the right.


Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News


The Nepali method, which takes three to four hours for a finished product, involves a technique called finger wrapping, where yarn is hand-formed into balls that look like marigold flowers, Tiwari said. If there’s one area where Nepalese women are straying from tradition, it’s by browsing YouTube for design ideas.

Bastola has been part of Stitch since its first meeting in 2014 and remains an enthusiastic participant in the refugee women’s workshop, two narrow rooms behind the retail section that are a hodgepodge of sewing machines, cutting boards, materials , tables and narrow aisles. It’s intimate, crowded, and a bit chaotic – but still a creative, communal environment.

“The foundation is creativity – it’s not political, it’s not religious – it’s creativity,” Hoeg said.

Refugees from Stitch Buffalo will exhibit weaving, embroidery and sewing at the Buffalo History Museum which opens May 21.

Sharon Cantillon



A festive display

Along with Stitch Buffalo’s work and support for the refugee community comes a renewed energy at the museum, sparking the launch of “Creative Journeys: Celebrating the Art of Refugee Women in Western New York.The exhibit, which opens with a hands-on embroidery workshop and meet and greet with artists from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday on the second floor of the museum, will run through August 20. Admission is free.

Hoeg met last year with Melissa Brown, the museum’s executive director, at Erie County Bicentennial Launchforging a friendship that has now blossomed into a partnership.

The exhibition – showcasing sewn, woven or embroidered objects – incorporates more than the work of Nepalese natives. Forty-four textile artists are presented, with the mostly from Burma, from where 10,000 refugees have come to Buffalo over the past decade. A museum spokesperson noted the importance of their stories in the larger narrative of Buffalo’s history.

“We tell the whole story of Buffalo and how our story continues to be made,” said Brian Hayden, director of communications for the History Museum. “We want to make sure we celebrate the diverse populations around the world who have already contributed so much to our city.”

“Going to the Buffalo History Museum is a big deal,” Hoeg said, citing the opportunity for refugee women to step outside the studio walls and see their work on display.

Stitch’s fleet of artisans are considered “shippers,” Hoeg said, with the goal of earning money from the textile art they create, ranging from embellishments to jackets to shawls and small gifts. Almost all of the money from merchandise sold off the storefront goes to the shippers themselves, not Stitch as a whole.

“We give the base to various projects, but they have complete creative freedom,” Hoeg said of the consignees. “They can choose their colors, choose their design, whether they want beads or not; are they going to do appliqués?”







Business People: Dawn Hoeg, Buffalo Niagara Partnership

Dawne Hoeg is the founder and executive director of Stitch Buffalo.


Photo added


Hoeg remains the only paid employee; it is supported by volunteers who help with skills developmentinventory, selling items, leading community classes, and sorting materials for Second Stitch, a lightly repurposed textile craft supply store that helps move discounted donated supplies and equipment.

As an overseer, Hoeg — who has worked as a textile arts professor and teacher at SUNY Buffalo State College and Aurora Waldorf School — trusts her expertise to understand consignees’ skills and suggest their best route to selling items. goods. She noted that Buffalo seems to offer refugees the most opportunities in the culinary field, but other skills – of which refugees bring a lot – have much more difficult paths to join the job market.

“Refugees can learn industrial sewing machine skills, which gives them a skill for workforce development,” said Hoeg, who said a textile background was not necessary. .







Stitch Buffalo and Buffalo History Museum (copy)

Steven Tee, a SUNY Buffalo State student whose parents are from Myanmar, makes a scarf on the knapsack loom, a textile tradition of the Karen people.


Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News


Fueled by Hoeg’s energy and volunteer support, Stitch’s growth was rapid. What started as a community project in 2014 in the Concerned Ecumenical Ministries building morphed into an official nonprofit in 2017, and then Rich Products’ donation of the building at 1215 Niagara St. enabled Stitch to open its first window the following year. Now Stitch has outgrown his space, with the basement and second floor filled with supplies, and precious little space for consignees to work in the back of the building.

The Stitch founder envisions a larger space where industrial sewing machines can sit on tables for longer access, with studio space for tables dedicated to cutting fabric and a wet space for printing and dyeing .

“We’re pushing at the seams of this building, and now we’re trying to figure out that next leap, which will be this fully functioning textile arts center,” Hoeg said.

As much as it is a space for creating and selling textiles, Stitch doubles as a chance to build community. This is the case of Munawara Sultana and Palwasha Basir, two refugees from different countries who have become friends through their work.

Sultana came to Buffalo from Pakistan, where she owned a business that sold handicrafts. She learned to sew from her mother, but also has a passion for traditional hand printing, using natural dyes on unisex jackets, shirts, tunics and shawls. Her block printing style is traditional Ajrak, which dates back to the beginning of civilization in the Indus Valley, she said.

She’s excited about her home country’s role reversal — “I’m the creative people now,” she said — but is also grateful for Stitch’s willingness to help her adjust to America after three months Long live, a shelter for asylum seekers run by Jericho Road Community Health Center. Over the next nine months, Sultana has learned to manage her own finances and isn’t intimidated by a bank.







Stitch Buffalo and Buffalo History Museum (copy)

Palwasha Basir, an Afghan tailor, works on shirts she has been commissioned to make.


Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News


Her friendship with Basir, a native of Afghanistan and a talented tailor, made Fridays at Stitch more enjoyable. Hoeg is encouraged by their interactions, which seem to brighten up the space. “They just talk – they share a lot of the same interests and the same language.”

Community is meaningful to Sultana, who feels a sense of belonging.

“I hadn’t planned to stay here, but I love this place,” Sultana said. “As soon as I walked into Stitch, I said, ‘This is my house.’ “

Ben Tsujimoto can be reached at btsujimoto@buffnews.comat (716) 849-6927 or on Twitter at @Tsuj10.

]]>
“This is my home”: Stitch Buffalo, refugee textile art presented at the History Museum | Local News https://kofoti.org/this-is-my-home-stitch-buffalo-refugee-textile-art-presented-at-the-history-museum-local-news/ Fri, 20 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/this-is-my-home-stitch-buffalo-refugee-textile-art-presented-at-the-history-museum-local-news/ Bright colors are inseparable from Nepalese culture. Vibrant shades of red, in particular, adorn the vestments of women and monks, while the national flag and flower of Nepal are both red. Attention-grabbing hues permeate home decorations, like the door hangings that will be on display at Stitch Buffalo’s art exhibition, which opens Saturday at Buffalo […]]]>

Bright colors are inseparable from Nepalese culture. Vibrant shades of red, in particular, adorn the vestments of women and monks, while the national flag and flower of Nepal are both red.

Attention-grabbing hues permeate home decorations, like the door hangings that will be on display at Stitch Buffalo’s art exhibition, which opens Saturday at Buffalo History Museum.

Tila Bastola and her sisters Saraswati Tiwari and Tika Bhattarai — three Nepalese textile artists at Stitch, a nonprofit at 1215 Niagara St. — agreed that the door hangings are far from an American welcome mat; they adorn the door frames of every room in a Nepalese home, even the bathroom.

Dawne Hoeg, the founder and executive director of Stitch, once approached American pom pom makers to help with the process of making these door hangings, but she was quickly rebuffed.

“No, no, no pom-pom makers,” Tiwari recalled telling Hoeg. “We like to do it our way.”

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Refugees from Nepal display vibrant door hangings that will be part of the Stitch Buffalo exhibit at the Buffalo History Museum. Saraswati Tiwari, left, stands behind her daughter Sachika Tiwari, 5, and niece Sijal Adhikari, 5. Tila Bastola holds an embroidered sign, while Tika Bhattarai, Sijal’s mother, holds another hanging door to the right.


Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News


The Nepalese method, which takes three to four hours for a finished product, involves a technique called finger wrapping, where yarn is hand-formed into balls that look like marigold flowers, Tiwari said. If there’s one area where Nepalese women are straying from tradition, it’s by browsing YouTube for design ideas.

Bastola has been part of Stitch since its first meeting in 2014 and remains an enthusiastic participant in the refugee women’s workshop, two narrow rooms behind the retail section that are a hodgepodge of sewing machines, cutting boards, materials , tables and narrow aisles. It’s intimate, crowded, and a bit chaotic – but still a creative, communal environment.

“The foundation is creativity – it’s not political, it’s not religious – it’s creativity,” Hoeg said.

A festive exhibition

Along with Stitch Buffalo’s work and support for the refugee community comes a renewed energy at the museum, sparking the launch of “Creative Journeys: Celebrating the Art of Refugee Women in Western New York.The exhibit, which opens with a hands-on embroidery workshop and meet and greet with artists from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday on the second floor of the museum, will run through August 20. Admission is free.

Hoeg met last year with Melissa Brown, the museum’s executive director, at Erie County Bicentennial Launchforging a friendship that has now blossomed into a partnership.

The exhibition – showcasing sewn, woven or embroidered objects – incorporates more than the work of Nepalese natives. Forty-four textile artists are featured, the majority of whom are from Burma, where 10,000 refugees have come to Buffalo from over the past decade. A museum spokesperson noted the importance of their stories in the larger narrative of Buffalo’s history.

“We tell the whole story of Buffalo and how our story continues to be made,” said Brian Hayden, director of communications for the History Museum. “We want to make sure we celebrate the diverse populations around the world who have already contributed so much to our city.”

“Going to the Buffalo History Museum is a big deal,” Hoeg said, citing the opportunity for refugee women to step outside the studio walls and see their work on display.

Stitch’s fleet of artisans are considered “shippers,” Hoeg said, with the goal of earning money from the textile art they create, ranging from embellishments to jackets to shawls and small gifts. Almost all of the money from merchandise sold outside of the storefront goes to the shippers themselves, not Stitch as a whole.

“We give the base to various projects, but they have complete creative freedom,” Hoeg said of the consignees. “They can choose their colors, choose their design, whether they want beads or not; are they going to do appliqués?”







Business People: Dawn Hoeg, Buffalo Niagara Partnership

Dawne Hoeg is the founder and executive director of Stitch Buffalo.


Photo added


Hoeg remains the only paid employee; it is supported by volunteers who help with skills developmentinventory, selling items, leading community classes, and sorting materials for Second Stitch, a lightly repurposed textile craft supply store that helps move discounted donated supplies and equipment.

As an overseer, Hoeg — who has worked as a textile arts professor and teacher at SUNY Buffalo State College and Aurora Waldorf School — trusts her expertise to understand consignees’ skills and suggest their best route to selling items. goods. She noted that Buffalo seems to offer refugees the most opportunities in the culinary field, but other skills – of which refugees bring a lot – have much more difficult paths to join the job market.

“Refugees can learn industrial sewing machine skills, which gives them a skill for workforce development,” said Hoeg, who said a textile background was not necessary. .







Stitch Buffalo and Buffalo History Museum (copy)

Steven Tee, a SUNY Buffalo State student whose parents are from Myanmar, makes a scarf on the knapsack loom, a textile tradition of the Karen people.


Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News


Fueled by Hoeg’s energy and volunteer support, Stitch’s growth was rapid. What started as a community project in 2014 in the Concerned Ecumenical Ministries building morphed into an official nonprofit in 2017, and then Rich Products’ donation of the building at 1215 Niagara St. enabled Stitch to open its first window the following year. Now Stitch has outgrown his space, with the basement and second floor full of supplies, and little valuable space for consignees to work in the back of the building.

The Stitch founder envisions a larger space where industrial sewing machines can sit on tables for longer access, with studio space for tables dedicated to cutting fabric and a wet space for printing and dyeing .

“We’re pushing at the seams of this building, and now we’re trying to figure out that next leap, which will be this fully functioning textile arts center,” Hoeg said.

As much as it is a space for creating and selling textiles, Stitch doubles as a chance to build community. This is the case of Munawara Sultana and Palwasha Basir, two refugees from different countries who have become friends through their work.

Sultana came to Buffalo from Pakistan, where she owned a business that sold handicrafts. She learned to sew from her mother, but also has a passion for traditional hand printing, using natural dyes on unisex jackets, shirts, tunics and shawls. Her block printing style is traditional Ajrak, which dates back to the beginning of civilization in the Indus Valley, she said.

She’s excited about her home country’s role reversal — “I’m the creative people now,” she said — but is also grateful for Stitch’s willingness to help her adjust to America after three months Long live, a shelter for asylum seekers run by Jericho Road Community Health Center. Over the next nine months, Sultana has learned to manage her own finances and isn’t intimidated by a bank.







Stitch Buffalo and Buffalo History Museum (copy)

Palwasha Basir, an Afghan tailor, works on shirts she has been commissioned to make.


Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News


Her friendship with Basir, a native of Afghanistan and a talented tailor, made Fridays at Stitch more enjoyable. Hoeg is encouraged by their interactions, which seem to brighten up the space. “They just talk – they share a lot of the same interests and the same language.”

Community is meaningful to Sultana, who feels a sense of belonging.

“I hadn’t planned to stay here, but I love this place,” Sultana said. “As soon as I walked into Stitch, I said, ‘This is my house.’ “

Ben Tsujimoto can be reached at btsujimoto@buffnews.com, (716) 849-6927 or on Twitter at @Tsuj10.

]]>
303 Magazine Florence Müller, curator of textile and fashion art at the Denver Art Museum, leaves in May https://kofoti.org/303-magazine-florence-muller-curator-of-textile-and-fashion-art-at-the-denver-art-museum-leaves-in-may/ Mon, 02 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/303-magazine-florence-muller-curator-of-textile-and-fashion-art-at-the-denver-art-museum-leaves-in-may/ The Denver Art Museum (DAM) announced last week the departure in May 2022 of Florence Muller, curator of textile art and fashion at the Fondation Avenir. Her work with the museum elevated Denver’s fashion scene and transformed fashion into an art form in the local community. Florence Müller, fashion curator at the Denver Art Museum. […]]]>

The Denver Art Museum (DAM) announced last week the departure in May 2022 of Florence Muller, curator of textile art and fashion at the Fondation Avenir. Her work with the museum elevated Denver’s fashion scene and transformed fashion into an art form in the local community.

Florence Müller, fashion curator at the Denver Art Museum. Photo by Brittany Werges

Müller joined DAM in 2015, developing the Textile Art and Fashion department which has grown enormously in recent years. As curator of the 2012 traveling exhibition Yves Saint Laurent: The Retrospective, Müller was instrumental in launching a luxury fashion presence in Denver.

Several exhibitions over the years have been the product of Müller’s work, including Dior: From Paris to the World; Shock Wave: Japanese Fashion Design, 1980s-1990s; Attracted by glamour: Fashion illustrations by Jim Howard; Paris in Hollywood: the fashion and influence of Véronique and Gregory Peck; and Suitable: self-contained women’s fashion. She also organized a new exhibition at DAM this month – Carla Fernández Casa de Moda: A Mexican Fashion Manifesto.

READ: Denver Art Museum’s new exhibit pays homage to the style of one of Hollywood’s most classic couples

“During my six years at DAM, I had the opportunity to work with an incredible team that helped me bring challenging projects to Denver,” Müller said. “I enjoyed my time curating exhibits on new and diverse subjects which helped to grow the museum’s permanent collections.”

Following the opening of the textile and fashion art galleries last fall, Müller felt inclined to pursue other projects. However, she plans to continue watching the museum and its fashion exhibits grow and prosper in the future.

The museum plans to seek a curator to replace Müller and will seek candidates internationally. Although Müller’s shoes will be tough to fill, DAM’s resources — including a recent $25 million anonymous endowment gift — will ensure a quick transition for the next curator.

“We are fortunate to have had Florence’s vision and talent in-house at the Denver Art Museum for the past six years,” said Christoph Heinrich, director of Frederick and Jan Mayer of DAM. “We look forward to seeing the mark Florence continues to leave on the world of art and fashion, as well as how the Denver Art Museum’s textile and fashion arts program evolves into its next chapter.”

]]>
Artists who take up a new history of textile art https://kofoti.org/artists-who-take-up-a-new-history-of-textile-art/ Sun, 01 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/artists-who-take-up-a-new-history-of-textile-art/ Textiles have long been markers of civilizations. Every stitch, pattern, even the wear, tells the stories of the people who made and wore them. For a long time, however, it was considered purely a decorative art, a kind of cottage industry. Until the last decades, when artists like Nelly Sethna, Monica Correa and Mrinalini Mukherjee […]]]>

Textiles have long been markers of civilizations. Every stitch, pattern, even the wear, tells the stories of the people who made and wore them. For a long time, however, it was considered purely a decorative art, a kind of cottage industry. Until the last decades, when artists like Nelly Sethna, Monica Correa and Mrinalini Mukherjee introduced it to the field of contemporary art.

Sethna used kalamkari in his large-scale mobile sculptures, while Correa imbues the weaves, created on a vertical loom, with the energy of color and movement. Mrinalini Mukherjee used dyed and woven hemp to create sensual sculptures. Today, young artists are pushing the boundaries of textile art. While some pursue repair with a single goal, others challenge colonial histories through the making of clothing. Still others are inspired by textiles to interpret them on other supports.

The act of reparation: Bhasha Chakrabarti

The American artist has always been interested in the act of mending. Usually associated with clothing or items for personal use, this form of repair has always been largely non-transactional and delegated to women. She sees in it “a creative gesture, which confronts fragility and impermanence. It could also be taken metaphorically – extending to repairing relationships and emotions. Pulling a thread from this literal form of domestic repair to the melee frays in the public realm, she attempts to rethink societal wounds, grumbles and scars as liminal spaces that can transpose us into the future without erasing the past. “But you can never fix anything back to its original state. There will always be cracks,” she warns.

Also Read: Meet the New Voices of Indian Art

Chakrabarti works with used clothes – creating paper from old jeans in blue notesor using old quilts and yarn to cover a painted figure until only the limbs are visible in A study of limbs and Lihaaf. Cloth generally dresses the body, but by painting bodies in oil – often nude – on textiles, or transferring images onto cloth, she reverses the idea. She plays with the idea of ​​hiding and revealing. “There is an element of surprise when people find an oil painting on fabric. But many seem to forget that painting is traditionally done on a canvas or linen support. I’m interested in that point in the history of art that distanced textiles and painting,” explains Chakrabarti.

“A Study of Limbs and Lihaaf (California King)”, 2020, by Bhasha Chakrabarti. Courtesy of the experimenter and artist

The fabric then becomes both support and subject. Priyanka Raja of the Kolkata-based Experimenter Gallery, which represents the artist, says Chakrabarti addressed issues of gender and the look at the body, particularly the female body, and, therefore, identity. The materials she uses…canthajeans, muslin, cotton rag paper – emphasize his concerns.

The duvet used in Lihaaf covering the painted body, for example, also refers to the tradition of quilting in Hawaii, where Chakrabarti grew up. It was used by American missionaries to “civilize the natives”. “The Hawaiians, however, made it their own. When Hawaii’s last monarch, Queen Lili’uokalani (1838-1917), was imprisoned, she had no freedom but to make quilts. She was embroidering messages for the people of Hawaii, so what was meant to be a form of suppression became a means of liberation,” the artist explains.

Read also: 16 works not to be missed at the India Art Fair 2022

Questioning colonial histories: Bushra Waqas Khan

The miniature sculpted garments – ivory dresses, European leg-sleeved dresses, a dress with 554 hand-cut roses, with each button a crystal-encrusted Swarovski – look like they’ve come straight out of a fairy tale. Viewers sigh at the sight of Medallion, an off-the-shoulder organza dress, presented at the India Art Fair by Delhi-based Anant Art Gallery. In a video call from Lahore, Pakistan, printmaker and seamstress Bushra Waqas Khan calls these dresses her “Alice in Wonderland moments”, each surprising her equally.

Not only are the works exquisitely shaped, but they make a subtle commentary on the colonial histories of South Asia. Khan reuses sworn stamp papers, proof of ownership, to create these sculpted dresses. “Previously, women had no right to property. Even though we were independent, we still followed the laws made by the British,” says Khan, who extracts patterns from stamp papers to add detail to garments.

A fine arts graduate from Lahore, she returned to her home of Multan, teaching in the printmaking department of the local art school, which had closed for lack of teachers, for a year before joining a fashion and design institute. design. This is where she realizes the potential of textiles. “That was in 2007-08. I would do fabric assemblages. I also started exploring Multan craftsmanship,” she says. After marriage and a child, she moved on to a medium that would allow her working from a small table at home. She began printing images onto heat transfer paper to create clothing. “I made a little black dress and hung it on a mannequin. But I couldn’t finish it because I was expecting my second child,” she adds.

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In this case, the dress was seen by a visiting art curator who invited her to participate in an exhibition. Short on time, she decided to create small-scale versions of the dresses. “And it’s been my medium ever since,” says Khan, who made her first miniature dress in 2019. Khan loves manipulating patterns to create illusions. The paper, when layered repeatedly, becomes so heavy that it takes on a shape of its own. “Under Rosa is made of organza and has such stiff lines. The material decides whether it will be a dress with a trail or a skirt with edges,” she says.

“Melancholy, You Stayed Too Long” by Hansika Sharma. Courtesy Threshold Gallery

The language of sons: Hansika Sharma

There’s Something Really Thoughtful About Hansika Sharma’s Story Melancholy, you stayed too long. The movement of gold and silver zari the embroidery on indigo-dyed linen almost mimics the rise and fall of emotions. The artist’s encounter with textiles dates back to her childhood in Assam and her visits to Arunachal Pradesh in the late 1990s. There she saw shawls, dyed in natural colors, being woven. This sparked a fascination with the fabric. She started reusing scraps and scraps of embroidered yarn in her work to create new stories. “Just as we have alphabets and numbers to write a sentence, Hansika forms a language with the threads and tana bana textiles,” says Tunty Chauhan of Delhi-based Threshold Gallery, which represents the artist. “Just as you highlight an important phrase in an essay, embroidered zari serve the same purpose in his work. It also helps to break up the monotonous and melancholy nature of deep indigo dye.

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Interpreting textiles in oil paintings: Haroun Hayward

The London-based artist, whose mother was a textile collector, uses textile patterns as inspiration for acrylic and oil works. The threadlike texture, created by scraping layers of paint, mimics the fibrous quality of textiles. “One of the fundamental tenets of my work is the relationship between pattern and rhythm in the visual of textiles (primarily Indo-Persian and West African) and pattern and rhythm in electronic music (primarily Chicago Acid House and Detroit Techno) which I also developed with,” says Hayward, whose work was presented at the Fair by Mumbai-based Isa Gallery. In a labor-intensive process, he begins with a blank wood panel covered in three coats of gesso, with sanding done between each coat.As he applies color, he hollows, carves and scrapes a composition onto the panels before the paint dries.

'Valley and River, Northumberland with Geometric Grid' by Haroun Hayward.  Courtesy of Galerie Isa

‘Valley and River, Northumberland with Geometric Grid’ by Haroun Hayward. Courtesy of Galerie Isa

“The lower left portions are the traditionally oil painted sections of the panel, and the lower right portions of the panel are the ’embroidered’ elements. It’s a delicate and time-consuming job because I essentially sculpt the relief with paint. When everything is applied and gently pressed all over, I mark the entire surface very gently so that it imitates the thread of an embroidery,” he explains. Together, the threads cohere like rhythmic forms, reflecting his interest in the subtle, repetitive tempos of electronic music subcultures.

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