Textile art – Kofoti http://kofoti.org/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 23:11:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://kofoti.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-20-150x150.png Textile art – Kofoti http://kofoti.org/ 32 32 Woodland Weavers and Spinners Guild Hosts Textile Art Market This Weekend https://kofoti.org/woodland-weavers-and-spinners-guild-hosts-textile-art-market-this-weekend/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 17:27:43 +0000 https://kofoti.org/woodland-weavers-and-spinners-guild-hosts-textile-art-market-this-weekend/ GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) – A lot of people are still in full gear shopping for the holiday season! It’s always nice to find something special and unique for family and friends and this weekend the Woodland Weavers and Spinners Guild is having their Textile Art Market. Bob and Kelly join us to tell us […]]]>

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) – A lot of people are still in full gear shopping for the holiday season! It’s always nice to find something special and unique for family and friends and this weekend the Woodland Weavers and Spinners Guild is having their Textile Art Market.

Bob and Kelly join us to tell us more about this special event!

Wood weavers and spinners guild

Textile Arts Market
December 10, 10 am-6pm
December 11 9 am-4pm
Aquinas College Donnelly Center
WoodlandWeaversAndSpinners.com

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Weekend Insights – Catch a Textile Art Exhibition at the Smithsonian American Art Museum – The GW Hatchet https://kofoti.org/weekend-insights-catch-a-textile-art-exhibition-at-the-smithsonian-american-art-museum-the-gw-hatchet/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 06:41:15 +0000 https://kofoti.org/weekend-insights-catch-a-textile-art-exhibition-at-the-smithsonian-american-art-museum-the-gw-hatchet/ Media credit: Grace Hromin | Main photo editor Stop at the Smithsonian American Art Museum to see over 30 works of art based on textiles, domesticity, and feminism. Before you leave the district for the Thanksgiving vacation, set aside time this weekend to experience DC’s vibrant arts scene and nightlife. Attend the DowntownDC Holiday Market […]]]>

Media credit: Grace Hromin | Main photo editor

Stop at the Smithsonian American Art Museum to see over 30 works of art based on textiles, domesticity, and feminism.

Before you leave the district for the Thanksgiving vacation, set aside time this weekend to experience DC’s vibrant arts scene and nightlife.

Attend the DowntownDC Holiday Market opening on Friday, see a performance by a world-renowned choreographer at the Kennedy Center on Saturday, and see a textile art exhibit featuring female creators at the Smithsonian American Art Museum on Sunday.

Friday

DowntownDC 17th Annual Holiday Market opens
To support local businesses, food vendors and artists while staying in the holiday spirit, head to the 17th Downtown Holiday Market, which opens this Friday. This “one-stop-shop winter wonderland” is located at the intersection of 8th and F NW streets, across from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery. The market will feature six food vendors selling tasty treats like mini donuts and empanadas through December 23. Browse over 70 exhibitors, including small businesses owned by blacks and minorities, offering specialties of arts, clothing, crafts and jewelry. Be sure to attend the opening kickoff from noon to 2 p.m. and stick around for a live jazz music performance after the event.

F Street NW, 7th to 9th Street NW. 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. Free. Find more information here.

Saturday

Akram Khan Company at Kennedy Center
Catch a performance featuring the dance company of critically acclaimed dancer and choreographer Akhram Khan as he wraps up his world tour at the Kennedy Center this weekend. Khan’s work integrates contemporary dance with the classical Indian dance form Kathak to convey the fictional experience of a colonial soldier during WWI. The chaos of war Khan portrayed on his tour, titled XENOS, earned him the 2019 Laurence Olivier Award for Outstanding Achievement. in Dance, and the show was called a “triumph of energy, empathy and intelligence” by the Daily Telegraph.

Eisenhower Theater, 2700 F St. NW. 8 p.m. Tickets range from $ 25 to $ 99. Find more information here.

Sunday

Subversive, skillful, sublime: the art of fiber by women
End the weekend with the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s groundbreaking new exhibit, “Subversive, Skilled, Sublime: Fiber Art by Women”. The exhibition features 34 intricate works of art, including sewn quilts, woven tapestries, and fabric, thread and thread sculptures, all created by female artists. The exhibition transforms the perspective on woven and hand-knitted textiles, which have historically been viewed by critics as “subordinate work,” into visual representations of identity. The selected works address complex themes of domesticity, feminism and the transmission of textile craftsmanship between generations. The exhibition presents a wide range of international artists, including Adela Akers, Consuelo Jiménez Underwood and Kay Sekimachi, and offers an alternative way to explore the history of women around the world.

Smithsonian American Art Museum, corner of G and 8th streets NW. Open from 11:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Free. Find more information here.


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Textile art from Peru exhibited to Adrian at the Inai gallery https://kofoti.org/textile-art-from-peru-exhibited-to-adrian-at-the-inai-gallery/ Sat, 13 Nov 2021 09:01:45 +0000 https://kofoti.org/textile-art-from-peru-exhibited-to-adrian-at-the-inai-gallery/ ADRIAN – As the colder winter months set in, the Inai Art Gallery, adjacent to the Weber Retreat and Conference Center on the campus of the Dominican Sisters Adrian’s Motherhouse, will do its best to warm up customers with an exhibit from Peru which is now open for the public to view. The “Cuadros Exhibition” […]]]>

ADRIAN – As the colder winter months set in, the Inai Art Gallery, adjacent to the Weber Retreat and Conference Center on the campus of the Dominican Sisters Adrian’s Motherhouse, will do its best to warm up customers with an exhibit from Peru which is now open for the public to view.

The “Cuadros Exhibition” will remain on display until February 27.

The Weber Center and the Dominican Adrian Sisters are located at 1257 E. Siena Heights Drive, Adrian. The easternmost aisle of the complex will be where the public can enter to access the Weber Center and the Inai Gallery. Inai (pronounced in-EYE) is a Japanese word meaning “inside”.

The exhibition features textile wall hangings, called cuadros in Peru. The textiles carry images that represent the lives of people living in the barrios – or slums – outside of Lima, Peru.

The women of Pamplona Alta create the cuadros using embroidery and pieces of cotton or other materials, according to a press release from the Adrian Dominican Sisters.

“The Cuadros are an art of survival, documenting the struggles of women living in difficult situations marked by political instability, economic hardship and lack of stable work,” the statement said. “They show hope and courage, presenting the stories of women through vivid colors, decorative patterns and vivid details.”


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The Inai art gallery presents an exhibition on cuadros, the textile art of Peru https://kofoti.org/the-inai-art-gallery-presents-an-exhibition-on-cuadros-the-textile-art-of-peru/ Sat, 13 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/the-inai-art-gallery-presents-an-exhibition-on-cuadros-the-textile-art-of-peru/ ADRIAN – As the colder winter months set in, the Inai Art Gallery, adjacent to the Weber Retreat and Conference Center on the campus of the Dominican Sisters Adrian’s Motherhouse, will do its best to warm up customers with an exhibit from Peru which is now open for the public to view. The “Cuadros Exhibition” […]]]>

ADRIAN – As the colder winter months set in, the Inai Art Gallery, adjacent to the Weber Retreat and Conference Center on the campus of the Dominican Sisters Adrian’s Motherhouse, will do its best to warm up customers with an exhibit from Peru which is now open for the public to view.

The “Cuadros Exhibition” will remain on display until February 27.

The Weber Center and the Dominican Adrian Sisters are located at 1257 E. Siena Heights Drive, Adrian. The easternmost aisle of the complex will be where the public can enter to access the Weber Center and the Inai Gallery. Inai (pronounced in-EYE) is a Japanese word meaning “inside”.

The exhibition features textile wall hangings, called cuadros in Peru. The textiles carry images that represent the lives of the inhabitants of the barrios – or slums – outside of Lima, Peru.

Sister Barbara Cervenka is co-director of Con / Vida – “With Life” – which is a non-profit organization in Detroit. The association exhibits works of art from Latin American regions and financially supports families in difficulty in these regions.

The women of Pamplona Alta create the cuadros using embroidery and pieces of cotton or other materials, according to a press release from the Adrian Dominican Sisters.

“The Cuadros are an art of survival, documenting the struggles of women living in difficult situations marked by political instability, economic hardship and lack of stable work,” the statement said. “They show hope and courage, presenting the stories of women through vivid colors, decorative patterns and vivid details.”

Sister Barbara Cervenka first visited Pamplona Alta in 1989 at the invitation of Sister Pam Millenbach, who ministered in the region with the late Sister Mary K. Duwelius. Cervenka is an artist herself and has prepared a small cuadros exhibition at the University of Michigan. Since then, the Detroit nonprofit Con / Vida – “With Life” – has shown cuadros’ exposure at nearly 100 venues, earning thousands of dollars that have helped support Pamplona Alta women and their families.

“Peru was in turmoil at the time. Sendero Luminoso, a terrorist group, was bombing buildings in Lima and ravaging small towns in the countryside, ”Cerevenka recalled in the press release about his stay in Peru.

Cerevenka soon came to admire the works of art of women so much that she brought back as many cuadros as she could to the United States. She and Mame Jackson are co-directors of Con / Vida.

Gallery opening hours are 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily or by appointment. Face masks and other blankets are required, and guests will be screened at the Weber Center reception or gift shop for temperatures and signs of illness.

To schedule appointment times, call 517-266-4090 or 313-608-9181.

This article originally appeared on The Daily Telegram: Textile Art from Peru Exhibited to Adrian at Inai Gallery


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Japan Foundation celebrates the cultural significance of ‘tenugui’ textile art https://kofoti.org/japan-foundation-celebrates-the-cultural-significance-of-tenugui-textile-art/ https://kofoti.org/japan-foundation-celebrates-the-cultural-significance-of-tenugui-textile-art/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 11:50:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/japan-foundation-celebrates-the-cultural-significance-of-tenugui-textile-art/ Following the success of the Furoshiki design competition held in February this year, the Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur (JFKL) is now accepting applications for the Tenugui design competition. Tenugui is a traditional Japanese cotton towel that is a staple in Japanese homes. The long sides are finished with a selvage, which prevents it from fraying […]]]>

Following the success of the Furoshiki design competition held in February this year, the Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur (JFKL) is now accepting applications for the Tenugui design competition.

Tenugui is a traditional Japanese cotton towel that is a staple in Japanese homes.

The long sides are finished with a selvage, which prevents it from fraying or fraying.

The short sides are simply cut away, with the “unfinished” edge being an important part of the aesthetic. Loose threads are part of a tenugui’s appeal, and it’s a mark of their authenticity. It is available in a standard size of 35cm x 90cm.

“This rectangular towel is used as an everyday object such as a washcloth or a tea towel, but also as a decoration, gift or souvenir, or as a scarf or a headband.

“It is a versatile item that is of infinite utility. It has a long history in Japan and it became popular among people when cotton was cultivated during the Edo period (1603-1868). In the 1990s , a few companies offered contemporary products of models based on traditional elements, which led to the renaissance of tenugui which continues to this day, ”explains Amira Sabri, program and administration manager of JFKL.

The theme of the Tenugui Design Competition is “Malaysia + Japan” and participants are encouraged to creatively incorporate various Malaysian and Japanese cultural elements.

The top three winners will win cash prizes of RM 1,500, RM 1,000 and RM 500 respectively.

The competition is open to Malaysians aged 18 and over. The closing date for registrations is October 31st. The design template is provided on the JFKL website here.


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Textile art exhibition opens Monday https://kofoti.org/textile-art-exhibition-opens-monday/ https://kofoti.org/textile-art-exhibition-opens-monday/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 08:30:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/textile-art-exhibition-opens-monday/ PORT TOWNSEND – Painted silk and pillows, Japanese-style rice bags, artistic and origami quilts, unique clothing and collages are among more than 100 pieces of Art as Gifts, the Surface Design Association’s new exhibit. opening Monday at Lawrence Street and Tyler Street in downtown Port Townsend. More than a dozen artists from Jefferson County, Clallam […]]]>

PORT TOWNSEND – Painted silk and pillows, Japanese-style rice bags, artistic and origami quilts, unique clothing and collages are among more than 100 pieces of Art as Gifts, the Surface Design Association’s new exhibit. opening Monday at Lawrence Street and Tyler Street in downtown Port Townsend.

More than a dozen artists from Jefferson County, Clallam and Kitsap have created wearable, functional and decorative works of art, all of which are on sale at prices ranging from a few dollars to several hundred, according to a press release. .

The exhibition is made possible by the space offered by residents of Port Townsend, Charley Kanieski and Liz Hoenig.

More information on each piece of art is available by scanning the QR code in the SDA window and visiting sda-np.com/art-as-gifts. Artist contact details are also available at the SDA table at the Port Townsend Farmers’ Market until early December.

Some of the artists exhibiting in Art as Gifts in the SDA Fiber Habit window include Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry, Sue Gale, Debra Olson, Janice Speck and Erika Wurm, of Port Townsend, as well as Donna Lark-Weiner, a former resident of Port Townsend . living in Redmond: Jeri Auty of Port Ludlow; Erica Iseminger from Chimacum; Linda Carlson, Liisa Fagerlund and Steffany Neuschaefer of Sequim; Evette Allerdings and Barbara Houshmand of Port Angeles; and Donna Lee Dowdney and Carol King Olsen of Bainbridge Island.

Members of the North Peninsula section of SDA meet monthly, with alternate meetings between Port Townsend, Sequim and Port Angeles.

The next meeting, scheduled for 10:30 a.m. on November 10, will take place at Sequim’s A Stitch in Time if COVID protocols allow it, or via Zoom otherwise. For more information, see sda-np.com/meetings.

For more information on the Surface Design Association’s national programs and publications, see surfacedesign.org.



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Bratcher loves the ewe’nic textile art of spinning – The Stanly News & Press https://kofoti.org/bratcher-loves-the-ewenic-textile-art-of-spinning-the-stanly-news-press/ https://kofoti.org/bratcher-loves-the-ewenic-textile-art-of-spinning-the-stanly-news-press/#respond Tue, 28 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/bratcher-loves-the-ewenic-textile-art-of-spinning-the-stanly-news-press/ A few years ago, out of the blue, Dakota Bratcher decided to start spinning. Not the popular physical exercise also known as indoor cycling, but rather the old-fashioned action of converting fiber into yarn. And the 29-year-old discovered textile art in a rather roundabout way. As a Stanly County native who lives with her husband […]]]>

A few years ago, out of the blue, Dakota Bratcher decided to start spinning.

Not the popular physical exercise also known as indoor cycling, but rather the old-fashioned action of converting fiber into yarn.

And the 29-year-old discovered textile art in a rather roundabout way.

As a Stanly County native who lives with her husband and two young boys on a farm in Aquadale, she is used to being around a group of animals. And she has a lot of them: cats, dogs, goats, chickens, guinea fowl and peacocks.

“All we have is something, it has a purpose,” said Bratcher, noting that his dog protects goats and his cats hunt mice.

About two years ago, Bratcher wanted to expand his assortment of animals to include sheep. But, like her other animals, she wanted them to serve a specific purpose on the farm. It was then that she realized that she could shear sheep and learn how to spin their fiber to create yarn.

The only problem was that Bratcher knew next to nothing about the craft and none of his friends or family knew anything either.

But that didn’t stop her.

“I literally jumped head first,” she said of the spinning.

It wasn’t easy though as she struggled at first with the specific terminology.

“I didn’t even know what a spinning wheel was called,” she said, noting that she initially Google searched for “thread-spinning thing” when she first expressed interest.

Once she bought two sheep and a spinning wheel, she turned to Google and Youtube to learn as much as possible. While most of the videos online made the craft really simple and easy, the reality for Bratcher was anything but.

Learning mainly through trial and error, Bratcher estimates that it took him about six months to fully feel comfortable filming. There were many days when, overcome with frustration, she just wanted to stop and throw in the towel.

“I would do maybe 15 minutes a day, get mad, tear up what I just did and start over,” she said.

Bratcher spins his thread by hand using a spinning wheel and spool (a pin on which the thread is wound.) The thread is connected to the spool, which is attached to the wheel, through the hole in the hole and a spool. Once Bratcher steps on the foot pedal, this is when the magic happens as the fabric is then quickly spun onto the bobbin.

Dakota Bratcher uses a traditional Ashford spinning wheel to spin the fabric. Photo courtesy of Dakota Bratcher.

But little by little, she improved and learned from her mistakes. After becoming adept at the craft, she began to dye her fibers in all kinds of colors. She is currently in pastels, but has also worked with bright colors.

“It’s whatever my mood,” she said of the colors she uses to dye her fabric.

After several months, Bratcher finally got rid of the sheep, as their voracious eating habits affected her beloved goats (the only farm animals she calls her pets), which she increasingly noticed. lean, due to the lack of available food. .

But even without her original source of fabric, due to the online connections she had forged since she started spinning, Bratcher now buys animal fibers, such as wool and fleece, from a variety of suppliers. local.

As people of all ages tour, Bratcher is unaware of anyone else doing it in Stanly County; many of the spinners she knows live in the mountainous regions of the western part of the state.

While there are several different ways to wind the yarn, Bratcher forms his into 4-ounce skeins or balls of coiled yarn. It takes about an hour to make a skein and she estimates that she makes about six a week. She enjoys working at night after cooking and taking care of her children. Unlike some people who enjoy craftsmanship, Bratcher’s yarn is 100 percent hand spun and comes exclusively from animal fibers.

Thread spinning is still just a hobby for Bratcher. For her day job, she works at Atrium Health Stanly as a certified medical assistant in the gastroenterology unit, which she says she really enjoys.

She regularly spins and sells her yarn at Norwood’s Farmers Market, has appeared at local craft and vendor shows, and has her own Be “ewe” tiful Fiber Designs business. She is also currently working on creating her own Etsy page.

Dakota Bratcher sells her yarn under the name Be “ewe” tiful Fiber Designs.

About a year ago, Bratcher contacted Robin Davis, owner of 110 Main Mercantile in downtown Norwood, and began selling his multi-colored skeins at the store. Her products have been popular, especially during the holidays, she said.

Dakota Bratcher Skeins can be purchased at 101 Main Mercantile in Norwood. Photo courtesy of Dakota Bratcher.

“As a supplier, Dakota brings unique and extraordinary talent to the 110 Main Mercantile,” said Davis. “His work on fibers allows us to highlight the tradition of spinning and the history of our textile heritage. “

Its skeins typically cost between $ 15 and $ 30 depending on the quality of the fiber and how difficult it is to acquire. Romney fiber, for example, is generally cheaper than silk or cashmere, she said.

Bratcher is always learning new things every day and finds ways to hone his craft.

“It’s just relaxing,” she said of the process. “I can sit there and do it for hours and hours and hours.”

If anyone is interested in purchasing their yarn, they can message Bratcher through their Facebook page or purchase their hanks at 110 Main Mercantile.

About Chris Miller

Chris Miller has been with SNAP since January 2019. He graduated from the State of North Carolina and received his Masters in Journalism from the University of Maryland. He previously wrote for the Capital News Service in Annapolis, where many of his stories on immigration and culture were published in national newspapers via the AP wire.

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Denver Art Museum receives $ 25 million to form Department of Textile Art and Fashion https://kofoti.org/denver-art-museum-receives-25-million-to-form-department-of-textile-art-and-fashion/ https://kofoti.org/denver-art-museum-receives-25-million-to-form-department-of-textile-art-and-fashion/#respond Thu, 02 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/denver-art-museum-receives-25-million-to-form-department-of-textile-art-and-fashion/ An anonymous donor has donated $ 25 million to the Denver Art Museum (DAM) to support its textile art and fashion department, the museum announced today. The money will allow DAM to set up a new textile art and fashion institute, which will be headed by Florence Müller, who since 2015 has been the museum’s […]]]>

An anonymous donor has donated $ 25 million to the Denver Art Museum (DAM) to support its textile art and fashion department, the museum announced today. The money will allow DAM to set up a new textile art and fashion institute, which will be headed by Florence Müller, who since 2015 has been the museum’s future curator of textile art and fashion. Fifteen million dollars of the transformational gift will provide an underlying endowment for scholarships and programming, including restoration and maintenance of the collection, while the remaining $ 10 million will go to an endowment fund supporting new acquisitions for the department.

“Fashion and textiles are exciting for me and our audience because they are so accessible – everyone has fashion and textiles in their home and in their everyday life,” Müller said in a statement. “This gift will allow us to build on the museum’s superb collections and tell more stories with them.”

DAM’s Textile Art and Fashion Department was created in 1927 with the donation of a Saltillo serape and a Kashmir shawl, and was officially created in 1955. In 2016, the department was endowed by the Avenir Foundation and the following year the gallery housing his collection, on the sixth floor of DAM was renovated. The collection, which grew considerably under Müller’s leadership, includes some five thousand objects from Asia, Europe and the Americas, with textiles ranging from archaeological fabrics to contemporary fiber work, and clothing spanning those from the 18th century to those of today. .

“The museum is deeply grateful for this important and powerful endowment donation,” said Christoph Heinrich, Frederick and Jan Mayer director of DAM in a statement. “The goals of the new institute are to support the development and sharing of the museum’s textile art and fashion collection and to create a base for academic research and exchange in ways that are engaging and valuable to our community. Textiles have been wonderful ambassadors and connectors between diverse cultures for thousands of years. They were used to communicate ideas and stories, share religious beliefs as well as notions of style and taste. Then as today, they are among the most beautiful documents of human creativity.

ALL IMAGES


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Woven in time: the Qualia gallery presents textile art | New https://kofoti.org/woven-in-time-the-qualia-gallery-presents-textile-art-new-2/ https://kofoti.org/woven-in-time-the-qualia-gallery-presents-textile-art-new-2/#respond Wed, 11 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/woven-in-time-the-qualia-gallery-presents-textile-art-new-2/ As a child growing up in a remote mountainous region of China, Dacia Xu would get together with friends to knit and crochet. “My earliest memories include images of my mother weaving,” she told this news agency. “The sound of the loom in the house made me feel safe and warm.” After opening the Qualia […]]]>

As a child growing up in a remote mountainous region of China, Dacia Xu would get together with friends to knit and crochet.

“My earliest memories include images of my mother weaving,” she told this news agency. “The sound of the loom in the house made me feel safe and warm.”

After opening the Qualia Gallery in Palo Alto in January this year, she vowed to herself that she would present a textile exhibition as soon as possible. She fulfilled this intention with “Entrelacé”, a collective exhibition of tapestries and textile art, presented until October 1.

The exhibition consists of seven artists (Terri Friedman, Kiki Smith, Hung Liu, Josh Faught, William Wiley, Robert Kushner and Xiaoze Xie) with works created using traditional and more contemporary processes. All artists adhere to one of the medium’s most basic goals: to tell a story.

Tapestries date back as far as the ancient Egyptians and Incas, who buried their dead in woven clothing. During the medieval period, tapestries were used by the church to convey stories from the Bible, insulate castles and provide privacy. A popular product, tapestry making made a major advance with the invention of the Jacquard power loom in the early 1800s. This allowed them to become more affordable and accessible to a wider audience.

The art of tapestry is represented in “Interlaced” by the work of Xie, Smith, Liu, Kushner and Wiley. All of these artists created the original designs, which were then sent to weaving workshops, often in Belgium. There, the computers that store the design information are used to complete the project. The works are bright, colorful and incredibly detailed. Xu explained why these artists, many of whom are painters, decided to explore textile art. “Personally, I guess the tapestries’ unique ability for detail, vivid colors, and texture might be the reason.”

Xie, a painter and art professor at Stanford University, oscillated between painting and tapestry for many years. Her Jacquard weavings in this exhibition depict sacred books, covered with fabrics and a stack of folded newspapers. The colors of these tapestries are intensely deep and beautiful and make the rather mundane subject shine with life. Xu explained that the artist enjoys using cultural objects like newspapers and books because they reflect “fleeting notions of time and our collective memory of events.” interest in these objects, because the viewer cannot actually read them. “

Liu, whose paintings are currently on display at the De Young Museum, was born in Changchun, China, and trained in the Chinese socialist realist style. This is evident in his brightly colored “Above the Clouds,” a portrait of a young child sitting on cushions as whooping cranes (symbols of happiness) fly around him. There is a peaceful serenity in the tapestry, as in “Madame Shoemaker”, where a kneeling figure works surrounded by spectacularly colored butterflies.

Liu died on August 7 at the age of 73. Xu said, “Hung was one of the first Chinese artists to make a career in the West. Her works which focus on the lives of women in Chinese history particularly touch me. She will be sorely missed. “

There are stark contrasts in the works of Kushner and Wiley. Using the Jacquard technique, the two artists designed wonderful landscapes. In the case of Wiley, known as a member of the UC Davis-based California Funk movement in the 1960s and 1970s, there’s a fantastic beast that nibbles at the sun, while planets, plants, and absurd writings fill the back. -plan.

Kushner’s work is more lyrical and figurative, with lush floral elements dancing across the tapestry. It’s easy to imagine his work adorning the walls of a well-appointed home, which is fitting since Kushner is involved in the Pattern and Decoration movement. These artists seek, according to the gallery’s press release, “to revere and produce art forms that had been marginalized as feminine or insignificant during the heyday of modernism.”

Xu also wanted to include artists who work in more traditional and practical weaving processes, but with decidedly contemporary, if not daring, results.

“I am particularly fascinated by artists who combine tapestry or weaving with other artistic forms. Some have turned drawing or painting into tapestry, while others have combined weaving, knitting or crochet with engraving, photography, objects and materials found, ”she said.

Faught, a professor of textiles at California College of the Arts (CCA), fits that description perfectly. Here he is depicted with several pieces that incorporate aspects of hand weaving (hemp is the material) with found objects woven or attached to the piece. “Off-nite” is a cheerful rendering of an arched window revealing a view of the blue night sky and a large crescent moon. On the right side, however, colorful socks hang from rainbow-colored pockets. A paint bucket, with a bright red overflow, sits on the floor and completes the room. The artist explained, “Found objects often exist as quick or urgent antidotes to the otherwise icy part of my production. As the spaces in which I place my work evolve, expand and diversify, my source materials expand with them.

Friedman, also a CCA faculty member, finds ways to incorporate objects and text into his hand-woven hanging pieces that reflect his background as a painter. In an email interview, she wrote: “My work is entirely guided by color. My practice has always been to try and explore painting with new methods and materials.”

“WHY” is a crazy quilt of colors and patterns, mostly in shades of pink and purple, with the word “why” woven prominently throughout the body of the piece. “Green Placebo”, a work in bright and contrasting shades of green and red, also has the title woven into the tapestry. “‘Green Placebo’ is inspired by my interest in neuroscience and the whole notion of brain plasticity / neuroplasticity. My job is to rewire the brain and the loom as a metaphor for cabling (warp / weft threads),” a said Friedman.

While there is a stark contrast between the tightly woven, mechanically produced tapestries and the freer handwork pieces in the exhibition, Xu believes that the entire cycle of history surrounding this ancient medium has returned to its point of origin. departure.

“New approaches to hand weaving, knitting and crochet might be the older approaches,” she said. “I hope that the exhibition can provide a glimpse of the evolution and development of the art of fiber over time.”

The Qualia Gallery is located at 328 University Ave., Palo Alto. More information is available on qualiacontemporaryart.com.

Email Contributing Editor Sheryl Nonnenberg at [email protected]


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Piece Work: Resistance and Healing in Contemporary Textile Art at the Fruitlands Museum https://kofoti.org/piece-work-resistance-and-healing-in-contemporary-textile-art-at-the-fruitlands-museum/ https://kofoti.org/piece-work-resistance-and-healing-in-contemporary-textile-art-at-the-fruitlands-museum/#respond Thu, 08 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://kofoti.org/piece-work-resistance-and-healing-in-contemporary-textile-art-at-the-fruitlands-museum/ Gina Adams, Honoring Modern 8, 2015, ceramic and encaustic, 9 “in diameter. Courtesy of the artist and Accola Griefen Fine Art; Photo: Aaron Paden The Fruitlands Museum in Harvard, Mass., Announced Piece work: resistance and healing in contemporary textiles Art, opening April 24, 2021. This group exhibition features the work of four contemporary artists – […]]]>
Gina Adams, Honoring Modern 8, 2015, ceramic and encaustic, 9 “in diameter.
Courtesy of the artist and Accola Griefen Fine Art; Photo: Aaron Paden

The Fruitlands Museum in Harvard, Mass., Announced Piece work: resistance and healing in contemporary textiles Art, opening April 24, 2021. This group exhibition features the work of four contemporary artists – Gina Adams, Alicia Henry, Andrew Mowbray and Leslie Schomp – who work with textiles and stitching to share inventive and aesthetic approaches to critique and reconcile the difficult aspects of American History.

Showcased in the museum’s main galleries and through site-specific interventions in historic Fruitlands buildings, Piecework will be the museum’s first major contemporary art exhibition and will champion the role of fiber arts in art discourse. contemporary as an innovative medium that can criticize and restore society in equal measure.

Andrew Mowbray, Apothecary Roses, Tyvek Home Wrap, wire, 2021, 82 x 58.5 inches.
Courtesy of the artist.

“The work of pieces marks a major change in our exhibition program,” notes curator Shana Dumont Garr. “It is a focus on contemporary art where each artist is eloquently anchored in history. I see each artist in the exhibition finding a way with their art to take what is useful from the past and advance that wisdom, while innovating for the future.

Each artist has been selected to critically engage with the historic spaces and collections of Fruitlands in order to reinforce a sense of context with the museum. Gina Adams (Ojibwe-Lakota, Irish-Lithuanian), uses archives of Indigenous history to create quilts and carvings, highlighting the words of broken treaties between settlers and Indigenous peoples. Alicia Henri, a black artist, creates overlapping and figurative wall hangings of black subjects from cotton, leather, felt, linen and burlap that are hand-sewn and embroidered. Andrew Mowbray cites examples of corporate collaboration with his quilts made of industrial Tyvek Home Wrap insulation, in which he modifies the logo to form dynamic patterns. Ultimately, Leslie Schomp raises the question of what generations might owe regarding climate change with a hand-sewn sampler placing quotes from Bronson Alcott and Charles Lane from 1843 in dialogue with David Wallace-Wells, author of The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Global Warming (2019).

Programming information

Trustee members get exclusive first access to the exhibit with a member-only preview weekend from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on April 24-25. To reserve your free pass, please visit thetrustees.org/program/member-preview.

During the exhibition, Gina Adams will offer the public an open program of letter cutting. She will also collaborate with artist Gregg Deal (Pyramid Lake Paiute) in a public performance adapted to the site.

In addition to artist lectures, the Fruitlands Museum will be offering a spring series of “Learning Fiber Arts” virtual demonstrations on Wednesday evenings in May and June. Demonstrations will include: traditional Shaker quilt blocks, historic embroidery primer, needle-felt toys, and materials unusual in the fiber arts. Students of the virtual sessions will also receive lists of recommended materials, a written tutorial, and a session recording to work on their skills after the demo session. This summer, an additional series of workshops will be presented in person at the Fruitlands Museum.

Contact:

Meaghan Flaherty Lawton

Reservations administrators

mlawton@thetrustees.org


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About the Reservations Trustees | Museum of fruit lands

Fruitlands Museum, owned by the trustees since 2016, is a historic, natural and cultural destination in Harvard, MA. Founded in 1914 by author and curator Clara Endicott Sears, the museum takes its name from an experimental utopian community that existed on this site in 1843 and was run by transcendentalists Bronson Alcott and Charles Lane. Fruitlands is dedicated to New England history, art, and nature, and its collections include: The Fruitlands Farmhouse, The Shaker Gallery, The Native American Gallery, and The Art Gallery. It sits on 210 acres of land with panoramic views of the Nashua River Valley including 2.5 miles of grassland and wooded recreational trails.


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