Five-day festival celebrating textile art in Wellington

Cheska Brown

“Soft Landing” by Finn Ferrier will be presented at the Page Galleries.

A five-day visual arts festival celebrating the historically undervalued artistry of contemporary textile practice comes to Wellington next month.

The Threads Textiles Festival will take place in several museums, galleries and other venues in the capital from March 16-20.

“At a time of continued uncertainty and disruption, I am grateful that we can move forward,” said festival coordinator Grace Ridley-Smith.

Following the Flaming Ceramics Festival and last year’s Face to Face Portrait Festival, for the third consecutive year, a cohort of the capital’s leading dealers and public galleries are collaborating to organize the Threads Textiles Festival.

'Burning Ganna Khet (Burning Sugarcane Farm)' by Quishile Charan, 2021.

provided

‘Burning Ganna Khet (Burning Sugarcane Farm)’ by Quishile Charan, 2021.

READ MORE:
* Aotearoa NZ Festival of the Arts releases streamlined program
* Gallery collaboration sees new visual arts festival for Wellington
* The Wellington Face to Face portrait festival aims to “demystify” contemporary art

It will include over 15 free exhibits and a slate of workshops, talks and venue tours spanning Lower Hutt, Petone, Thorndon and the town centre.

It also includes a one-day symposium hosted by the Dowse Art Museum that will unravel the line between textiles and contemporary art. This symposium will feature presentations from influential local and international textile personalities, including New Zealand designer Kate Sylvester and Azerbaijani contemporary artist Faig Ahmed.

From intricate embroidery and 1970s haute couture, to psychedelic oriental rugs, Maori weaving and Niue barkcloth, the festival would demonstrate the diversity of textiles and the innovative ways practitioners were adapting centuries-old traditions. to contemporary works of art, Ridley-Smith said.

Erica van Zon renders watery scenes – an acid-toned slushy drink next to a swimming pool in Fiji, a foamy hydro slide, infant swimming lessons, pool floats – into tapestries, embroidery, beadwork, photography and more for his solo exhibition at Jhana Millers.

provided

Erica van Zon renders watery scenes – an acid-toned slushy drink next to a swimming pool in Fiji, a foamy hydro slide, infant swimming lessons, pool floats – into tapestries, embroidery, beadwork, photography and more for his solo exhibition at Jhana Millers.

The festival hoped to shed new light on the medium and challenge traditional Western art history which had often viewed textiles as part of the domestic domain, and therefore separate and inferior to “high culture” painting and sculpture. “.

The breadth of techniques and styles encompassed in the program defied categorization and encouraged festival-goers to reconsider conventional notions of textile art, Ridley-Smith said.

Wellington boutiques Caughley, KAUKAU, Minerva, The Service Depot, Twenty Seven Names and Yu Mei are also participating in this year’s festival.

Areez Katki explores commonly used words in English that have Persian roots - musk, persimmon, algebra and alcohol - in a series of embroidered handkerchiefs on display at the McLeavey Gallery.

Courtesy of Tarq Mumbai

Areez Katki explores commonly used words in English that have Persian roots – musk, persimmon, algebra and alcohol – in a series of embroidered handkerchiefs on display at the McLeavey Gallery.

The annual Visual Arts Festival is organized by Wellington’s Cultural Institutions with a mission to demystify and increase access to contemporary art.

As with the two previous editions, the festival is based on a collaborative model in which participating galleries and museums simultaneously organize textile-themed exhibitions and events, working together to create a program and share audiences.

The model is decentralized, with events taking place across the city. This allows it to adapt to public health measures.

Kevin Berkahn evening dress and cape photographed at Bannockburn Sluicings, Central Otago, by Derek Henderson, 2019. On display at the Dowse Art Museum as part of the Eden Hore: High Fashion/High Country exhibition.

Derek Henderson/supplied

Kevin Berkahn evening dress and cape photographed at Bannockburn Sluicings, Central Otago, by Derek Henderson, 2019. On display at the Dowse Art Museum as part of the Eden Hore: High Fashion/High Country exhibition.

The festival is supported by the Wellington City Council Arts and Culture Fund and the Blumhardt Foundationand is part of the Aotearoa New Zealand Festival of the Arts.

Comments are closed.